March 9, 2000

If you grew up in Ontario (or England) in the late seventies you might have seen a children's television program called ĎVision Oní. It was a BBC show that encouraged kids to draw, paint, collage and create with the added twist that it took special account of deaf children. There was limited dialogue that was always concurrently signed, lots of mimed slapstick, and many weird visuals. There was also lots of great music in the background and a theme song that plays in the back of my mind every time I pull out the glue, scissors, and paper.  And I know that I am not the only one who has been haunted by the Vision On theme song.

One night I was with friends at Franís Restaurant on College in Toronto. As we were waiting at our table for our food, I heard an array of trumpet notes which I immediately recognized as the Vision On theme song and I rushed to the jukebox to find out who did that song. The thing is, I wasn't the only one. At the same time, a guy at a table at the front of restaurant made a similar beeline to the juke.

And we fell in love.

Actually, no. We didn't. In today's romance obsessed world, it sometimes seems that love is the only acceptable end of a story. The world could end but as long as the guy gets the girl, then it's all ok.

No, what really happened was that I learned that if two people in a crowded restaurant both could be bothered enough to jump from their seats to determine who does the Vision On theme song, then surely there must be others who wants to know.

The Vision On theme song is called "Java" and is done by a gentleman named Al Hirt. 


 
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